China finally admits: Wuhan death toll far higher

The Chinese authorities are yielding to the increasing worldwide pressure. As the US, France and the UK governments are all stating they will be asking critical questions about the spread of Covid-19 to the government in Beijing, the latter has now adapted some of it’s virus-related figures.

The coronavirus has now killed 3,869 in the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the epidemic first emerged.

That is all of a sudden 1,290 more than what the Wuhan authorities had communicated in recent weeks. This was reported by the Chinese state channel CCTV.

In a press release circulated on social media, the city explains that at the peak of the epidemic, some patients died at home because they could not be hospitalized. So they were not counted in the official statistics, which only took into account who died in a hospital.

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Also, reports were not passed until much later or were incomplete, as medical workers and institutions were overwhelmed by the epidemic.

These new figures bring the total number of deaths in China to 4,632.

The number of infections was also adjusted, with 325 additional infections. Across China, this involves well over 85,000 infections.

Beijing says that it has largely curbed the epidemic, but other countries are increasingly suspicious about the official version that Beijing is spreading.

Yesterday evening, to great surprise, British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (who is currently standing in for Prime Minister Boris Johnson who is still recovering from the virus) said there would be “hard questions” for Beijing.

Furthermore, in an interview with the Financial Times this week, French President Emmanuel Macron said it would be “naive” to think China had handled the pandemic well, adding: “There are clearly things that have happened that we don’t know about.”

It is clear that the US is no longer standing alone in it’s criticism of how Beijing handled the crisis so far.

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